i-ItalyNY - 2014-06 - page 31

PastaMania
Special FancyFoodShow, NYC2014
|
June-July 2014
|
i-
Italyny
|
31
●●
RIGATONI ZUCCAESALSICCIA
“Z
ucca”, or squash, was
imported from America
to Europe, thanks to
Christopher Columbus. For a long
time it hasn’t really been appreci-
ated in Italy; it was used mainly by
southern peasants and was consid-
ered “poor people’s food.” Over time,
however, it became a very popular
ingredient for pasta dishes and this
variation, pairing squash with Ital-
ian sausage, is really a must.
Chop scallion and brown in a
deep thick pan with extra virgin
olive oil
Remove sausages
from skins and add them to the
saucepan, stirring and mincing
the meat with a fork. Let the meat
cook for about 5 minutes until
brown
Cube squash and add
it to the pan, stirring in with the
meat for a fewminutes
Add
white wine and cook for another
5 minutes until it evaporates
Lower the flame, cover and let it
cook for 10 minutes
Meanwhile,
when the water comes to a boil,
add coarse salt and toss in the
rigatoni, stirring occasionally so it
doesn’t stick. Cook rigatoni for 14
minutes until “al dente”
When it
is ready, don’t strain the rigatoni—
just remove it from the pot using
a large slotted spoon and add it to
the saucepan. The starch in the
water will help the sauce stick
to the pasta
Cook over a high
flame for a minute or so, stirring
thoroughly
Before serving add
some extra virgin olive oil and
sprinkle with grated parmesan
cheese
Rigatoni zucca e salsiccia
may be paired with a red wine, not
too dry, such as Lambrusco, from
central-northern Italy.
●●
SPAGHETTIALLAPUTTANESCA
l
Serves 4
24
oz
D
e
C
ecco spaghetti
n
8
oz
diced tomatoes
n
6
tablespoons
D
e
C
ecco extra virgin olive oil
n
1/3
pound of black olives
n
6
anchovy filets
n
1
clove of
garlic
n
1
tablespoon of capers
n
A
sprig of parsley
n
S
alt and
pepper to taste
n
T
his celebrated Southern dish is
comparatively young for Ital-
ian standards; its popularity
spiked in the 1960s. It gets its name
from the word “puttana”, meaning
(pardon our Italian) “whore.” Nobody
really knows where this name comes
from, but some argue that it’s a refer-
ence to the sauce’s hot, spicy flavor. It’s
also a quick, cheap meal--not politi-
cally correct, but definitely tantalizing.
Pour extra virgin olive oil into
a deep pan and add a clove of
garlic, stirring to give flavor to
the oil
Meanwhile, cut the
tomatoes, discard the center, and
then finey dice the remaining to-
matoes
Add the anchovy filets
to the pan and stir thoroughly
Add black olives and continue
stirring (if possible, buy fresh
untreated and pit them yourself)
Coarsely chop some anchovies
so that they release flavor more
rapidly
Add capers
Add pep-
per and salt to taste—but don’t
overdo it: capers and anchovies
are already pretty salty
Add
diced tomatoes and let the sauce
cook for about 15 minutes
When the water comes to a boil,
add coarse salt and toss in the
pasta, stirring occasionally so
it doesn’t stick
Cook for 12
minutes until “al dente.”
When
ready, strain the spaghetti with a
colander—but do not rinse
Pour
the spaghetti into the saucepan,
sprinkle with fresh chopped
parsely and mix thoroughly with
the sauce
Spaghetti alla put-
tanesca should be paired with
a young, well-bodied red wine.
A good choice would be Ischia
Rosso, from the famous island
just in front of Naples. But you
may stick to more popular wines
from Sicily such as Nero d’Avola.
l
Serves 4
24
oz
D
e
C
ecco rigatoni
n
2
I
talian sausages
n
16
oz squash
n
1
carrot
n
1
scallion
n
4
fl
.
oz
white wine
n
4
tablespoons
D
e
C
ecco extravirgin olive oil
n
4
tablespoons grated
P
amigiano
n
Above:
‘Farfalle’gettingreadyatthe
DeCeccoproductionplantinFara
SanMartino.
Below,left
:Thebronze
diesusedatDeCeccotodrawpasta
shapes.
Toitsright
:TheTheimageof
apeasantwomancarryingsheaves
ofharvestedwheathasadornedDe
Ceccopackagesforoveracentury.
TIP#3 Neverrinsepastaunlessyouare
preparingacolddishsuchaspastasalad.
Rinsingwouldeliminatethestarchinthewater,
anecessaryelement thathelpsthesaucestick
better.Besides, rinsingwouldcool thepastaand
prevent it fromabsorbingthesauce.
Adifferenceyoucantell.
DeCecco’slowtemperature
and slowdrying process
evokes the traditional
sun-dried method
for drying pasta,
which preserves
the natural color of
semolina (so it does
not dry to a darker
yellow-brown color)
and helps avoid
pasta breakage.
Thisvideo-
recipeonyour
smartphone
Thisvideo-
recipeonyour
smartphone
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